Slash- Slash

Leave a comment

December 5, 2010 by Dan Swinhoe

Slash is a legend. Of this there is no doubt, and neither can anyone doubt his six string skills. with his first proper solo album he is out to prove them once again, The album premise is simple; a different singer on each track, the vocalists ranging from across the music spectrum, some being Slash’s idols, others being friends or people he’s liked in the last few years.
This star studded album isn’t the only one of its kind, Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath did the same thing years ago and Dave Grohl (who features on Watch This) in 2004 with his Probot project, but this is the most cohesive attempt yet. Slash’s signature sound is plastered all over this album, and the quality remains high throughout. The only problem is that his sound is so synonymous with Guns ‘N’ Roses that at times this does sound a little too similar and a lot of the singers have a similar style to a certain Mr. A. Rose.
Ozzy’s Crucify the Dead is one of the best he’s sang on in ages and his soon to be released Scream is set to be another epic from the prince of darkness. Wolfmother’s Andrew Stockton singing on Die By The Sword is a slow busy number and Chris Cornell on Promise hits the right notes with Promise in a way he hasn’t done since his first solo album. Slash also shows off why metal heads love him so on Nothing To Say,  a power metal number that is set to be a live favourite.
Slash seems to be able to get the best out of the people he works with and the man himself is on form with some classic riffs and solos, without overpowering the song. the only real downside is that some of the tracks pass by without leaving much of an impression, not because they are bad, but more just not massively impressive.
While Will.I.Am is making tabloid headlines with Cheryle Cole, Fergie is creating a very successful partnership with Slash, their B-side cover of Paradise City rocking hard and their song for the album Beautiful Dangerous is one of the better contributions. And although it is a dead ringer for Appetite… era  G’n’R it is still an awesome track and the proposed rock album her and Slash are planning to make should be well worth a listen.
For kids who know him from guitar hero, they will love it, and his legend will grow just a little bit more through another generation. For older fans of G’n’R they will either enjoy it and not take it too seriously or see it as a poor attempt at a tribute album and a fancy cash in. Those people are losing out, and are probably not worth talking to. Overal this is a strong album, not the best or defining of his career, but it is another bow in Slash’s impressive bow.Slash is a legend. Of this there is no doubt, and neither can anyone doubt his six string skills. with his first proper solo album he is out to prove them once again, The album premise is simple; a different singer on each track, the vocalists ranging from across the music spectrum, some being Slash’s idols, others being friends or people he’s liked in the last few years. This star studded album isn’t the only one of its kind, Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath did the same thing years ago and Dave Grohl (who features on Watch This) in 2004 with his Probot project, but this is the most cohesive attempt yet. Slash’s signature sound is plastered all over this album, and the quality remains high throughout. The only problem is that his sound is so synonymous with Guns ‘N’ Roses that at times this does sound a little too similar and a lot of the singers have a similar style to a certain Mr. A. Rose.
Ozzy’s Crucify the Dead is one of the best he’s sang on in ages and his soon to be released Scream is set to be another epic from the prince of darkness. Wolfmother’s Andrew Stockton singing on Die By The Sword is a slow busy number and Chris Cornell on Promise hits the right notes with Promise in a way he hasn’t done since his first solo album. Slash also shows off why metal heads love him so on Nothing To Say,  a power metal number that is set to be a live favourite. Slash seems to be able to get the best out of the people he works with and the man himself is on form with some classic riffs and solos, without overpowering the song. the only real downside is that some of the tracks pass by without leaving much of an impression, not because they are bad, but more just not massively impressive.
While Will.I.Am is making tabloid headlines with Cheryle Cole, Fergie is creating a very successful partnership with Slash, their B-side cover of Paradise City rocking hard and their song for the album Beautiful Dangerous is one of the better contributions. And although it is a dead ringer for Appetite… era  G’n’R it is still an awesome track and the proposed rock album her and Slash are planning to make should be well worth a listen.
For kids who know him from guitar hero, they will love it, and his legend will grow just a little bit more through another generation. For older fans of G’n’R they will either enjoy it and not take it too seriously or see it as a poor attempt at a tribute album and a fancy cash in. Those people are losing out, and are probably not worth talking to. Overal this is a strong album, not the best or defining of his career, but it is another bow in Slash’s impressive bow.

Original at:

http://www.detourmagazine.co.uk/2010/05/13/slash-solo-album-review/

Follow me on Spotify

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Welcome

This is essentially my online CV, all my articles and bits from all over the interweb. Read and enjoy

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 56 other followers

Follow DanSwinhoe on Twitter

Categories

See my published work collected on Scribd

Get this blog straight to your Kindle

Google+

%d bloggers like this: